23 | Feb
02:00PM
23 | Feb
02:00PM

lecture

The Rest of the Story: Finding Your Family in Online Newspapers

Janeen Bjork will share her search methodology using several case studies to illustrate the techniques of finding and preserving family items from online newspapers. She will discuss OCR (optical character recognition, the technology that allows newspapers to be searched online), and how to work around its significant failure rate. Other topics will include best practices for searching in popular newspaper resources, and websites to explore.

Janeen Bjork is a TV researcher and genealogy teacher. She has been obsessed with the information historical newspapers contain ever since she found a story about the 1894 murder of her great-great grandfather in a Syracuse, NY newspaper.

Ticket Info: $5 at the door; free for JGS members

lecture

15 | Mar
10:00AM
15 | Mar
10:00AM

children's workshop

Kids in the ‘Hood: Discover the History of Your Community - For Children 7-12 and Their Families

Join us for an exciting morning of activities that will inform, inspire, and motivate you to learn more about the history of your family and community. First, get a sneak peek at the fun and surprises that come from learning about local and family history. Then, choose two of the following activity stations: 

PHOTO EXPEDITION: Tour our newest exhibit, then uncover clues hidden in photos. Bring your own photographs or examine some of ours. 

YOU DO THE INTERVIEW: Get trained in interviewing techniques—and use what you’ve learned to do your own interview. 

DETECTIVE’S TOOLBOX: Hear about the best places to search for community history. Next: Explore more on our computers!

TALES ARTIFACTS TELL: Learn some New York City history by examining “everyday” objects in the Museum’s collection – and discover what artifacts can reveal about your neighborhood.

Every family that attends this program will be entered into a raffle, with prizes including a one-year subscription to Ancestry.com and an Ancestry DNA kit. Raffle winners must be present at the 12:30 PM drawing to claim their prize.

About the program’s lead developer/presenter: Ira Wolfman is president of POE Communications, an editorial consulting firm that works with media companies, museums, and nonprofit organizations to develop high-quality digital and print content for children and adults.

Note: Our programs frequently sell out. It is highly recommended that you purchase tickets in advance.

This program is supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council.

Ticket Info: $10/family; $8/family CJH/Partner members (maximum of 4 children per family) kidsinthehood.bpt.me or 800-838-3006 (please specify number of children and adults attending)

Tickets: Available online

children's workshop

22 | Mar
02:00PM
22 | Mar
02:00PM

book talk

A Forgotten Land: Growing up in the Jewish Pale

Speaker: Lisa Cooper

A Forgotten Land is the story of one Jewish family in the Russian Empire of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, set within the wider context of pogroms, World War I, the Russian Revolution, and civil war. Lisa Cooper is fortunate that her grandmother was a great storyteller. Lisa’s father, who grew up in Canada surrounded by his mother’s tales of shtetl life, made recordings of her stories and later translated them from the Yiddish.  These stories, and the book which grew from them, give us insight into the lives of our ancestors.

Lisa Cooper is a British writer, journalist and artist. Lisa studied Russian at Edinburgh University.  During her year as a student in the then-Soviet Union, armed with an address dating from the 1960s and a family tree, she made contact with cousins in Kiev who introduced her to a web of relatives she’d known nothing about. The experience helped breed an interest in both family history and Ukrainian Jewish history.

Ticket Info: $5 general at cooper.bpt.me or 800-838-3006; free for JGS/CJH members, no reservation required

Tickets: Available online

book talk

19 | Apr
02:00PM
19 | Apr
02:00PM

lecture

Scandals, Shandehs, and Lies: The Stories Families Don't Tell

Speaker: Renee Steinig

In the course of decades of genealogical research, Renee Steinig has uncovered many a "skeleton in the closet" – cases of illegitimate birth, infidelity, abandonment, and even murder, all hushed up for decades. A suburban businessman who led two lives; a Romanian immigrant hanged -- or so his family thought -- for "stealing horses;" a Jewish GI's love affair in Belgium during World War II; a young woman who married, had a baby, then vanished.... Renee will talk to us about these family secrets and others, the research tools that uncovered them, and the reunions and reconciliations that followed many of her discoveries.

Renee Steinig began doing genealogical research in the 1970s. Many family trees and some 18 years later, she began to accept client work. She is member of the Association of Professional Genealogists, a past president and longtime trustee of the JGS of Long Island, and a director of Gesher Galicia.

Ticket Info: $5 at the door; free for JGS members

lecture

26 | Apr
10:00AM
26 | Apr
10:00AM

walking tour

Walking Tour: The Unexpected Story of Jewish Williamsburg (2.5 hours)

It would be fair to call Williamsburg the Lower East Side’s lesser known sibling. Opening in 1903, the Williamsburg bridge, which connects the Lower East Side to Williamsburg, soon came to be known as “The Jewish Highway.” Jewish immigrants, seeking to escape the crowded tenements of the Lower East Side, resettled in Williamsburg in large numbers. They brought with them all of the character of similar enclaves – Yiddish, kosher butchers, and synagogues – as well as the familiar ambition of upward mobility. However, unlike the Lower East Side, Williamsburg was not soon past its heyday.

After the Holocaust, Hungarian survivors, many of whom were Hasidic, became the next wave of immigrants to make their American starter homes in Williamsburg. But this second wave did not want to move on and Americanize. They stayed in Williamsburg, despite the polluted East River, high crime and crumbling infrastructure, and maintained their traditions. Even as North Williamsburg has been reborn as a trendy hipster enclave in recent decades, the fourth generation of Hasidim continue to thrive in South Williamsburg. Our tour will take us through this story by way of the buildings, streets, and synagogues, with a nosh of the famous Hungarian kosher cooking.

About the Tour Guide: Frieda Vizel is a New York City tour guide who specializes in Jewish Williamsburg. She grew up in the Satmar Hasidic community and her four holocaust survivor grandparents lived in Williamsburg. She has since left the fold, but remains drawn to the area‘s rich legacy.

Location and other details: This tour will begin at Congregation Beth Jacob Ohev Sholom (284 Rodney St.). Please plan to arrive at 9:45 AM to check in. We will not wait more than a few minutes for late arrivals. This tour will take place rain or shine. Please dress modestly, wear weather-appropriate clothing/shoes, and bring water. Note: Some tour stops are not wheelchair accessible.

This program is supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council.

Ticket Info: $30 general; $25 CJH/Partner members, students, seniors at williamsburg.bpt.me or 800-838-3006

Tickets: Available online

walking tour