21 | Nov
07:00PM
21 | Nov
07:00PM

book talk

The Newish Jewish Encyclopedia with Unorthodox Podcasts hosts, Stephanie Butnick and Liel Leibovitz

Deeply knowing, highly entertaining, and just a little bit irreverent, The Newish Jewish Encyclopedia is an unputdownable encyclopedia of all things Jewish and Jew-ish covering culture, religion, history, habits, language, and more. Readers will refresh their knowledge of the Patriarchs and Matriarchs, the artistry of Barbra Streisand, the significance of the Oslo Accords, the meaning of words like balaboosta,balaganbashert, and bageling. Understand all the major and minor holidays. Learn how the Jews invented Hollywood. Remind themselves why they need to read Hannah Arendt, watch Seinfeld, listen to Leonard Cohen. Even discover the secret of happiness (see "Latkes"). Join two of the authors, Stephanie Butnick and Liel Leibovitz, for the newish-Jewish story behind this concise compendium. Reception and book signing follow the program.

Ticket Info: $15 general; $12 seniors; $10 CJH/Partner members, students at encyclopedia.bpt.me or 800-838-3006; $18 at the door

Tickets: Available online

book talk

24 | Nov
02:00PM
24 | Nov
02:00PM

jewish genealogical society programs at cjh

"One of the Greatest Untold Stories of WWII": A Decade-Long Quest After My Father and a Quarter Million Other Holocaust Refugees

It is a largely unknown and astonishing fact that most Polish Jews who escaped Nazi extermination survived as refugees in Uzbekistan, Kazakhstan, Iran and India. Mikhal Dekel, whose then 13-year-old father was such a refugee, will share her archival research and global travel to retrace their 13,000 mile route. Dekel tells a story at once intimate and historically sweeping, conversing along the way with Polish nationalists, Russian oligarchs and human rights activists, Iranians, Korean Uzbeks and Israelis, and painting a story of interlinked and divergent histories, of death and survival, of hospitality and cruelty, and of 20th- and 21st-century politics.

Mikhal Dekel is Professor of English and Comparative Literature at the City College of New York and the CUNY Graduate Center and Director of the Rifkind Center for Humanities and the Arts. She is the author of Tehran Children: A Holocaust Refugee Odyssey (W.W.Norton, 2019) and other books and articles.

Ticket Info: $5 general at dekel.bpt.me or 800-838-3006, free for JGS/CJH members (tickets not required)

Tickets: Available online

jewish genealogical society programs at cjh

09 | Dec
06:30PM
09 | Dec
06:30PM

panel discussion

Jews of the Wild West

Soon to be a feature length documentary

PLEASE NOTE: This is not a film screening.

Western Jewish pioneers are a largely forgotten chapter in U.S. history. And yet, they played a definitive and often colorful role shaping the expansion of the United States. There were nationally known names such as Levi Strauss, Samsonite founder Jesse Shwayder and the Guggenheim family, who built their great fortunes through grit and determination in California and Colorado. And there were also lesser-known characters such as Solomon Carvalho, a Sephardic painter and photographer who spent the mid-1800s documenting the territories of Kansas, Colorado and Utah. Wyatt Earp’s wife, Josephine Marcus Earp, was a Jewish dancer whose beauty is rumored to have triggered the fight at the OK Corral. And by the end of the 19th century nearly every notorious Wild West town, including Deadwood and Tombstone, had a Jewish mayor.

The wagon trains that moved westward with Jewish families traveled for the same reason as many settlers: opportunity. By 1912, it is estimated over 100,000 Jews had migrated to the Wild West. They put down roots and, today, many of their descendants are entrepreneurial and philanthropic leaders in the West. They epitomize the important legacy of immigration in America.

Soon to be a feature length documentary, Jews of the Wild West was partially researched in the archives of the American Jewish Historical Society. In a conversation moderated by Rabbi Joseph Black of Temple Emanuel in Denver, Amanda Kinsey speaks with Annie Polland, Executive Director of the American Jewish Historical Society and Ann Kirschner, author of Lady at the O.K. Corral: The True Story of Josephine Marcus Earp.

Ticket Info: $15 general; $12 seniors; $10 CJH/Partner members, students at jewsofwildwest.bpt.me or 800-838-3006; $18 at the door

Tickets: Available online

panel discussion

11 | Dec
06:30PM
11 | Dec
06:30PM

family history today: genealogy programs at the center

Personal Archiving 101 - Preserving your Digital Memories

VHS? Floppy disks? Vacation photographs? Everyone has digital materials that hold personal meaning and tell stories about their lives. Join archivist Maggie Schreiner for a personal digital archiving workshop and learn how to care for and preserve your digital memories! Master the basics of digitizing and caring for your collections of documents, photos, and audiovisual materials. Learn about file formats and storage, straightforward tools and techniques, and common risks and dangers (and how to avoid them!).

An ASL interpreter may be made available if requested in advance.

This program is supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council.

Ticket Info: $10 general; $5 CJH/Partner members, seniors, students at archiving.bpt.me or 800-838-3006

Tickets: Available online

family history today: genealogy programs at the center

15 | Dec
02:00PM
15 | Dec
02:00PM

jewish genealogical society programs at cjh

Mismatched Mishpocha: Strategies to Analyze Endogamous DNA

This lecture will discuss how best to weed out false-positive DNA matches that Jewish DNA test-takers face daily. Alec will outline the data that demonstrates the unique ways in which endogamous populations match each other. Then, by using visualization tools such as DNA Painter, he will illustrate webs of interrelationships and identify genetic pile-up regions (or multiple shared autosomal DNA segments stacked up on top of each other) that may not indicate shared ancestors. Although there is no surefire method as of yet to remove false matches, by having a more thorough understanding of endogamous results, we can better analyze our match data.

Ticket Info: $5 at the door; free for JGS members

jewish genealogical society programs at cjh